Tuesday, 15 July 2014

New Blogger Blog Hop

So I've been taking part in this New Blogger Blog Hop hosted by the lovely Beth at Plum and June. And this is my week. So far, the experience has been great. Thanks to everyone that has been involved and to Beth for putting this on!

Plum and June

I thought long and hard about what I wanted to write about for my post for the hop. I'm so bad about introductions. I always feel like I'm filling out an online dating profile or something. I like long walks on the beach, etc. (um, actually long walks on the beach sounds really nice). And I do have an 'about me' page on my blog (so I feel like I'm covered, um, kind of).

But here's something that is maybe new to you (whether you've been here before or not). I'm a little bit of a an academic (I can hear the doubt and snorts of derision now, but its true). Books and information are like food to me (and libraries give me this little high- I shouldn't be allowed into them). In fact, I've noticed that most quilters are highly educated highly intelligent people.

That being that, the origin of my quilting journey actually started long ago with my study of the origin of all goodness- fabric (well, textiles as a more encompassing term). I had almost forgotten about it. It almost seems like a different life now (kids will do that to you). I even forgot that I have a bin of fabric that I collected in India- a stash before I even knew I had a stash (or even used the word)!


Celebrating a local god in India, Tamil Nadu

I spent two tours of duty, so to speak, in India researching and studying textiles/fabric.

Left to right: Hallway of temple in Tamil Nadu, Taj Mahal, and a holy man, or sadhu (who wanted me to take his picture)

This is the place to buy fabric. It's like one of the birthplaces of weaving and textiles and cotton- lots of cotton.

Wall of fabric, silk sari (modelled by a man), and a bunch of local women buying saris (it's a group decision)

I studied the social and economic aspects of saris (the local dress) and spent sometime researching the handlooming industry of India. I even co-curated a museum exhibition on textiles from around the world. Someday I have to write about it all (other than the papers and theses I've already written about it).

Handloom workshop in India. All the looms are recessed into the floor.

So I have more background in fabric than I would ever remember to admit.

And I would call myself an artist before I would call myself a quilter (or academic). You can read about the transition from a paint media to quilting here (and see the reason why the boys are part of the blog).

From left to right: Mini quilt,  first quilt ever
Star Wars quilt
I haven't completed many quilts yet. I like to say I'm into the slow sewing movement (like the slow food movement, but with sewing), but it's usually not by choice (hence the 'boys' added to the name of this blog).

Wedding quilt
From left to right: Melodie's quilt, Feathers quilt

Currently I'm working on a double wedding ring quilt for my brothers wedding. Never mind I have relatively new quilting skills and no experience with sewing curves. But I like to jump into things like that. I mean if you're going to do it, man... just really do it (for better, or for worse, this seems to be my mantra).

 

Lastly, here's my one little bit of knowledge that I will leave you with (gleaned from all those years researching, studying, etc). Ikat (pronounced ee-cot), is a term that often connotes a certain design. But ikat is really a technique, where the warp threads (ones that run up and down) and the weft threads (ones that run across) are dyed before they are woven together. The result is patterns and designs that are slightly feathered on the edges (because it's pretty hard to match up the threads when weaving them). Real ikat material will look the same on the back and the front (and usually costs more because it requires more skill to achieve).

Ikat sari from India

And now you are a little bit smarter and can carry on to visit all the rest of the awesome bloggers that are taking part in this hop!

Elli @ Lovelli Quilts
Sally @ Wonky Patchwork



Plum and June

34 comments:

  1. The wedding ring quilt is looking awesome. I too like to jump into things and figure them out later; it's worked pretty well so far. The ikat info. was new to me, so thanks for the enlightenment.

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  2. I love a bit of knowledge! Thanks for sharing that about Ikat (and how to pronounce it, I've totally been saying 'eye-cat' - philistine!). I know what you mean about jumping in at the deep end. I tend to do that myself, but it make the end result even sweeter :)

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  3. Interesting intro Jehnny. I like your projects that's why I decided to stick around :)

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  4. wow totally love your introduction, so different from others, and your fabric experience is amazing, as your quilts too, totally love to look at your blog

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  5. Love the look of your double wedding rings! I'm sure you'll be a pro at curves once it's all done! Interesting info about the textiles. I've also been pronouncing ikat as eye-cat. Oops!

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  6. What a great read and I love your quilts, the double wedding ring is wow. Your paper pieced Star Wars is perfection, colours are so appealing and eye catching :)

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  7. Nice to meet you. I love books and would love to have a library in my house rather than having them in different rooms around the house. Half of the fun is to jump in the deep end and see what happens. The results can be stunning.

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    1. Thanks Cynthia! Our books are scattered all over too. Mostly where ever I can fit a bookshelf. Maybe one of the boys should give up their rooms ;) and I'm hoping this jump I'm taking will end up stunning!

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  8. So you are the girl to talk to if my mum and I ever manage our planned trip to India. I never knew that about Ikat too. Thanks for the explanation!
    I too 'like to jump into things like that'. I find it is how I learn: bite off more than I can chew and then chew like crazy.
    I am one step ahead of Cynthia. I do have a dedicated library in the house and it is one of the biggest rooms. The luxury of a big house and no resident kids!

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  9. I love libraries too - my S.O. usually just sits in the car and listens to music if we go together because I take so long and he can't put up with it! I have two large canvas bags at home that I keep all my library books in. I read written material better than digital material, so a lot of what I have learned (despite reading lots of blogs) have been from library books. :)

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    1. I too am old school that way too Jess! My husband also has to put up with my constant reading!

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  10. What a great academic background! Your quilts are beautiful and I'm into the slow sewing movement too. I have too many projects on the go at once to finish anything quickly!

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  11. Wow, what a cool background to have; your time in India seems like a really amazing experience. Thanks for the education about Ikat. I share your guilty pleasure of libraries. And book stores. My favorite way to relax and unwind at the end of the day is to read a chapter of two... or you know, until I finish the book ("just a few more pages!"). I admire how you jump in with both feet, and will be here cheering you along as you finish up the wedding ring quilt for your brother and whatever else comes next! :)

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  12. Hi Jehnny,
    Nice to meet you! Great introduction - you seem like such an interesting person with such a fascinating background, and so knowledgeable about a mutual interest. I'm in awe of your Indian textile research and experience. Can't wait to see more about textiles on your blog. Is making a quilt out of sari fabric something you would consider?
    Good luck with the wedding quilt - it'll be fabulous and they'll love it, I'm sure.

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  13. Hi there, fellow blog hop host! I love, love, the tag line on your blog name! Too funny! Oooh... look at all that colour in those Indian fabrics. I've wanted to do a quilt of Sari fabrics forever, but the opportunity has never presented itself. The feathers quilt and the double wedding ring in progress are ah-may-zing! Lovely eye candy to be seen here! Methinks I will be following you! :)

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  14. I love the wedding quilt and the Star Wars quilt! Too fun! Great to meet you!

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  15. What a great story! You're a textile expert. Thanks for sharing about Ikat fabric.

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  16. such knowledge, I love the wall of fabric I would love to have that...:) Love your quilts especially the feather one!!!

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  17. Thank you for sharing all of the beautiful colors and knowledge from fabric, I wish I had the opportunity for such things as you did! What an experience!

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  18. Your textile background is fascinating. Thanks for sharing. I used to be a slow finisher, but now I love quick quilts.

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  19. Jumping in over your head with the double wedding quilt is brave and I find that sometimes when you don't know what you're getting yourself into it's the best chance for success. Fascinating to have the textile background.

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  20. Your double wedding ring is amazing! I'm making a curved pieced quilt for my friend's new baby. My first quilt with curves too! I also find that tidbit about Ikat (and how it's pronounced) fascinating. Thanks for the info!

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  21. Hi Jehnny, I love your quilts! Especially the feathers, and Star Wars quilt--my husband would love it if I made him a star wars quilt! I like your pictures from India, very cool that you studied textiles there, I think it's very interesting. I also had no idea what Ikat meant, it seems to be very popular now, but I always thought it was the pattern. Every day is a school day, thanks for sharing!

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  22. I love your work! So so inspiring.
    And how amazing to have travelled to study fabric. Wow!!

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  23. Visiting from Plum and June's Blog Hop. Nice to meet you! Carole @ From My Carolina Home

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  24. fascinating post - thanks for sharing. Your quilts are gorgeous, and I love that you have been to India - I grew up there and it still holds my heart.

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  25. I did not know that - thanks for the info. Love your star wars quilt especially the back! Have you heard of Coursera.org? I love them for online learning!

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  26. Very fun post! I am glad to learn how to pronounce ikat

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  27. Hi, Jehnny,

    I love your blog! Your colour sense is really great and it translates into beautiful quilts. Hope to see more! Thanks for dropping in for a visit on my site and weighing in on the binding dilemma.

    Carmit
    www.quiltingrainbows.com

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  28. Your quilts are stunning! I certainly don't cringe at the 'academic' title but embrace it! I love that you're always learning and exploring and trying new things.

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  29. I've had a crazy busy week or two so am only now getting round to visiting on the blog hop. I love so many of your quilts, and your fabric background was really interesting. What an amazing place to study and spend time. Probably a good job that you weren't a quilter then, can you imagine how much fabric you might have brought back then?! I'm off to find out about your transition from paint media to quilter now, sounds intriguing.

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  30. I love your blog header. I am originally from India and grew up surrounded by fabric and I can only imagine what a rich experience it must have been to spend all that time just researching and knowing about fabric.

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  31. Jehnny, amazing! Just now finally catching up on the last of the hop but wishing I'd been here sooner to glean such neat info. Thanks for the lesson about Ikat and for the interesting peek into your life pre-kids (all that time I spent researching media literacy in college at least pays off now when I say "no, you can't watch any more TV today!" haha).

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  32. Amazing photos of India! The hand looming room is incredible, as is the wall of fabric. My parents had friends from Sri Lanka when I was little and I was always awe struck by the amazing saris they would bring. I have a 5 year old daughter and a 3 year old son and I just got a fitbit to see how much running around the house and yard and stores and... I actually do during the day. The results are a bit mind boggling! Create and destroy pretty much sums up our household (and my three year old). Your quilts are lovely - the mini and the feathers quilt stand out to me as being sort of 'my style'. I can't believe anyone has the patience for a double wedding ring but it is on my bucket list.. It looks like you have a fantastic start on it!!

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